Room Rental

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meeting room north

Room Rental

Our clubhouse was constructed in the early 1920's to include a large second floor room for meetings or social events. The floor space is unobstructed by support columns. This was accomplished with the use of scissor trusses above, to support the roof and spread the load to the outside walls. The floor is made of Georgia long leaf pine, and dances were held in the room from the start. The ceiling was equipped with electric lighting. In the center of the room a ship's wheel, salvaged from the Calidonian, serves as a chandelier.

  • A member in good standing for at least one year may be accepted for the privilege of room rental for a party or special event.
  • The conditions and limitations of rental are subject to the approval of the House Chairman and the members of the Board of Trustees.
  • Only members of the Ossining Boat & Canoe Club may rent the upstairs hall.
  • The member must remain present for the duration of the rental event.
  • Rental is subject to a rental fee of $150 and a cleaning deposit of $50
  • The cleaning deposit will be returned subject to satisfactory inspection after the event.
  • Maximum occupancy for the room is 80 persons.
  • Email the House Chairman for application and scheduling

 

social hall south

The following excerpt is from the Citizen-Sentinal, March 28, 1925:

Upon the second floor is ensconced the meeting room 38 x 40 feet, recently improved by a conventional Georgia pine flooring, greatly to the delight of those who foregather for dancing, with a kitchen, boatkeeper’s room, and the embryo retiring room mentioned aforesaid. So, here we have all the comforts of home, plus a broad piazza from which the far reaches of the Tappan Zee may be enjoyed as one tilts back to capacious rocking chairs. The joiner work in the-dance room is done in hard wood and beaver board paneled in tasty design. From the center is suspended a lighting fixture as novel as it is reminiscent. The mahogany steering wheel of the hay barge Caledonian which went to pieces at Sparta Dock a number of years ago is made to do duty as a circle upon which to hang a number of pendant electric light bulbs, the center being a dome light of 100 candle power.  It was on the main deck of the barge Caledonian that the late John L. Sullivan really began his pugilistic career, engaging in a contest with one flood upon the waters and netted Sullivan $1,000.

 

Caladonian wheel clean